Tuesday, 22 July 2014

Mary Oliver

I thought the earth remembered me,
she took me back so tenderly,
arranging
her dark skirts, her pockets
full of lichens and seeds.
I slept as never
before, a stone on the river bed,
nothing between me and the white fire of
the stars
but my thoughts, and they floated light as moths
among the
branches of the perfect trees.
All night I heard the small
kingdoms
breathing around me, the insects,
and the birds who do their work
in the darkness.
All night I rose and fell, as if in water,
grappling with
a luminous doom. By morning
I had vanished at least a dozen times
into
something better.
     - Mary Oliver

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Sunday, 20 July 2014

Mariko Ishikawa



Pink & Green, papers and watercolor, 36 x 26 x 4.7 in., 2013

Joseph M. Jahn

artistjournals:

Winter Lamb 
 Joseph M. Jahn 

Winter Lamb
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Link
 

Pascal Campion

Sunday morning for you too.#pascalcampionart.It’s Sunday morning… I felt like doing a sketch, but didn’t feel like I wanted to draw the way I usually do, so I tried something different( again).On a different note.We are now at $60 000 on our Kickstarterhttps://www.kickstarter.com/projects/3000moments/3000-momentsI can’t believe it.. I’ll make a thank you note , but, just for now, THANK YOU SO SO SO much everybody. This is amazing!Lastly… I’l be doing a live Q&A tonight,at 8 Pm ( Pacific time) with Geek Pile.Here is the link.http://www.blogtalkradio.com/geekpile/2014/07/21/40—pascal-campion-3000-moments-qahave a GREAT ( lazy) Sunday! 

Sunday morning for you too

Link

Untitled



Unknown source

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Brigitte Romaszko

Microcosme3

Microcosme3
Mixed
Sand, earth-paper, wire and bits of string

Link

Patricia Bin

Rebecca Jewell

Mizuki Goto

Čestmíra Suška

Chris Shaw

Wednesday, 16 July 2014

Amy Ludwig VanDerwater

Stay Close
When sorrow comes
to those you love
stay close.

When sadness is
more powerful than words
more powerful
than deeds
your warm hand
your quiet company
your self in a chair
saying nothing
will be a gift.

You may wonder
"What can I do?"
There may be
nothing
you can do.

You may wish
to run.
Do not run.

Hold hands.
Eat soup.
Listen.
Trace a sunbeam
with your fingers
on the table.
 Let yourself smile.
Let yourself cry.

When sorrow comes
to those you love
stay close.

When sorrow comes
to you
let others
stay close too.
 -contributed by Amy Ludwig VanDerwater

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Monday, 14 July 2014



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John Steinbeck



  •          
    theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

    6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

    1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
    2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
    3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
    4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
    5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
    6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
    "If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."
  • Susan Hertel

    1

    Paula in the Kitchen
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    Artist not Working
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